Small Businesses Impacted During D-Days
4 mins read

Small Businesses Impacted During D-Days

Dakota Days can be a time for fun and celebration for students and also be a great boost of support for local businesses. However, these businesses go through a lot of prep to accommodate the new influx of people. If you’re a business owner looking for convenient financial solutions during this busy season, consider exploring a business credit card—view here for options that can streamline your transactions and provide the flexibility you need.

Jim Waters and Monica Iverson opened Cafe Brule in 2011 and the Dakota Brick House in 2017. Both Waters and Iverson have a passion for food, and the idea was to bring something new and bring good food to Vermillion. 

During Dakota Days, these businesses are extremely busy, which can be challenging to handle. Most businesses, especially those in popular areas, have to adjust to the high influx of new customers. Business owners choose to merge Google Workspace accounts for the accessibility and safety of documents during this time.

“We have to order more things; we have to try to find extra staff, which is extremely difficult because everyone wants the weekend off,” Iverson said.

Dakota Days is a highly anticipated USD tradition that has been around since 1914. For many, it is a time for celebrating and showing school spirit. 

“Party time! I mean, everyone is happy and looks forward to it,” Iverson said. “It has calmed down a little bit; I mean it’s still crazy downtown, but it used to be like every other business had a broken window out front.”

Whether it’s because of a change in culture, or just that now practically everyone has a camera ready in their pocket, it is much more difficult to get away with these things now than in the past.

“You just don’t get away with stuff like you used to,”  Waters said. “It’s kind of like you do something stupid, and someone is posting it, so it’s gonna come back and haunt you.”

The aftermath of Dakota Days can be substantial to some businesses, both in a positive and negative way. 

“It’s still a lot of garbage and pickup. Just restocking and getting ready for the next week,” Iverson said. “It’s wonderful to have the new people in town because a lot of people come to town and maybe didn’t know that Cafe Brule or [Dakota] Brick House existed. They might come back and have dinner next week. It’s good for every business.”

Waters and Iverson are passionate about their businesses and seemingly do what they do out of a love for them. They think of both businesses like their children: they love them both equally, each one having a distinct personality. In the realm of home-based businesses, maintaining a professional image is paramount. Opting for a virtual postal address through services like Birmingham Virtual Office for Enhanced Privacy and Professionalism can significantly bolster your business’s credibility. This approach not only safeguards your personal information but also establishes a more corporate presence. It’s a strategic move that clients often view favorably, acknowledging your commitment to privacy and professionalism.

“In this industry, in the food industry especially, the margins are just tiny, so you do this out of love and out of passion more than anything,”  Waters said.

 After COVID-19, many small businesses have been struggling to bounce back, with some still unable to do so even after the issuance of the first gazette notice. Having a local affair that brings people in is great for a community. 

“Dakota Days is just another great boost that every business needs,” Iverson said.

After the football game, Dakota Brickhouse will have pizza from 11 p.m. to 2 a.m. on Friday and Saturday and walking tacos from 11 p.m. to 2 a.m. on Saturday.

Photo Credit: The Volante